Dog Recall – Get A Great Recall With Our Training Tips And Guides

Dog Recall – Get A Great Recall With Our Training Tips And Guides

The first thing to remember is that your dog needs to have some sort of command that makes him want to come back home. If he doesn’t, then there’s no point in trying to teach him anything else!

So what do you need?

Well, here are just a few ideas:

1) Call out “Come!

” or something similar.

2) Say “Goodbye” (or whatever phrase you like).

3) Give a treat every time he comes back.

Or, if he does it without any treats, give him a reward.

4) Teach him to sit and stay until called upon.

 

5) Train him to go into another room where there’s food/water.

6) Make him walk around the block three times before calling him over.

7) Have him run up to you and touch your hand.

Then say “Come.”

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8) Have him jump up and down while saying “Come.

9) Have him lay down on a mat and call him over.

10) Do all these things until he wants to come back home. You’ll probably have to work at them one after another, but eventually you’ll get it right!

Eventually, you’ll be able to call your dog over from pretty far away. Be sure to always give him a treat and praise him when he gets to where you are though!

It takes a while but it’s definitely doable.

If you need more help with this, ask your teacher or parent for more tips–they’ll be able to give you a few good ones!

3 Simple Tricks To Teach Your Dog

There are three tricks that I’ve found to be very easy to teach a dog. I’m not talking about the same old ‘shake’ or ‘roll over’ though they’re pretty easy too.

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I’m talking about something a bit more useful in every day circumstances.

The first is the ‘go to bed’ trick. Pretty self explanatory, this one simply requires you to take your dog to his bed or blankets and say the words ‘go to bed’.

After some repetition, many dogs will learn that they’re to go there on command. This can be useful when you want to leave your dog alone but don’t want him to chew up your shoes. Simply tell him to go to his bed and he’ll happily hop onto his blankets and fall asleep!

Multiple Dog Trick: Have two dogs and want the to go lie down quietly without having to individually tell each of them to do so?

Simply tell one to ‘go to bed’ and then immediately tell the other one ‘quiet’. After a few weeks, they’ll learn that the first command means lay down and sleep while the second means be quiet. It saves you time and your dogs will appreciate not having to listen to your commands anymore!

The second is the ‘find it’ trick. This one is really fun and pretty simple to do.

All you need is a bag of treats (peanut butter works best). Instead of feeding your dog out of a bowl, hide the treats around the house or yard (you can do this indoors as well). Let’s say you hid a treat under the couch. Telling your dog to ‘find it’ will probably have him sniffing around and eventually finding the treat. As soon as he does, praise him and give him more treats. It should be done in rapid succession (do this fast so he’ll associate good things with the find it command). Eventually he’ll learn that ‘find it’ means to search for whatever you hid.

This works really well if you’re trying to keep your dog busy while you’re in another room. Just make sure you hide enough treats for him to find!

Multiple Dog Trick: Have two dogs and don’t want them to fight over the treats you hide?

Simply hide the treats around the house and say find it. This will have one dog searching for the treat while the other watches. Once he finds it, have him sit and praise him. Then repeat the process with another treat. The dog watching will learn that he just has to wait for his sibling to find the treat before getting praised.

Have fun with this trick and start hiding the treats in more complicated spots. You’ll be surprised at how well they learn this trick!

The third is the ‘out’ trick. This one teaches a dog to willingly go into his crate or any other confined area when you tell him to.

The best way to do this is start by placing treats or toys inside and letting him get used to the idea of entering. Then, after repeated trials, start saying the command ‘out’ once he’s in. Do this several times.

Once he’s understanding, start closing the door before placing a few treats or toys inside. Do this several times as well before finally telling him to enter.

Finally, close the door and say ‘out’. If he obeys, praise him and then let him out.

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If not, keep him in there until he does. Continue this until he consistently obeys the command.

Multiple Dog Trick: Have two or more dogs and want them to enter their crates simultaneously?

Start by putting a treat in one of the crates and letting one dog enter to get it. After he’s done, place another treat in the second crate and let the other dog enter. After placing several treats in each crate. say ‘out’ to have them exit. Finally, after doing this several times, tell them to enter at the same time. They’ll learn that entering means good things happening and that they can both get these good things at the same time!

This trick is useful for when it’s time for them to go into their crates. You can also use it to help them learn the wait command as well (explained later).

They’re bound to pick this up quickly!

The fourth trick to training dogs is the shake trick. This one is really easy to teach because all you have to do is take their paw and gently pull it back so their elbow is straight and they’re shaking your hand!

You’ll want to give them a treat after doing this to reinforce the behavior. Once they understand, try having them do it on command.

The fifth trick is the ‘roll over’ trick. All you have to do for this one is get down on their level, gently pull their front leg and tell them to ‘roll over’.

They’ll naturally roll onto their backs and understand what you want from them.

Once they’ve done this, give them a treat and praise them for their efforts.

Multiple Dog Trick: Have two or more dogs?

This trick is even easier with multiple dogs. All you have to do is get down to their level, call one over and gently pull their front leg. The rest of the dogs will naturally assume the position and roll over!

After they understand what you want, give all of them a treat and lots of praise for being awesome!

The sixth trick is the ‘handshake’. All you have to do for this one is gently hold their paw when they offer it to you and then give them a few pats on the head.

After the first few times, they’ll understand what you want and will offer you their paws when they want to practice the trick.

Once they’re consistently doing this, you can teach them the ‘high five’ by having them raise their second paw as well.

Multiple Dog Trick: This one is easier with multiple dogs. All you have to do is get down to their level, gently hold one of their paws and then give them all a few pats on the head afterwards.

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After they understand what you want, you can try the ‘high five’. All you have to do is have them raise their other paw as well after giving the ‘high five’.

Simple, right?

The final trick is the ‘play dead’ trick. This one is harder than the rest, but still easy. What you have to do is get down on their level, gently place one hand on their shoulder and then pull back as if you’re going to roll them over, but stop halfway through and pretend to shoot them. You’ll need to tell them to play dead after doing this or else they’ll think you’re actually hurting them.

After they understand what you want, give them a treat and lots of praise for being so flexible and agile!

Multiple Dog Trick: When training multiple dogs, this one is easier. All you have to do is get down to their level, gently place one hand on their shoulder and then pull back as if you’re going to roll them over.

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